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New Baby
 

 New Baby? Reporting Your Birth Abroad

We assist U.S. citizen parents in determining whether their children born abroad are entitled to U.S. citizenship and, if so, by providing information on the procedures and documentation necessary to obtain a Consular Report of Birth Abroad and U.S. passport.  For information about registering the birth of your child overseas and how to obtain additional copies of consular birth, death, and marriage records, please visit the United States State Department website.

Appointments

While a Consular Section employee will be available to assist American Citizens with most Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) services at any time during normal working hours, U.S. citizens can ensure more efficient service and shorter wait times if they schedule appointments in advance. In order to make certain you bring the required documents with you to the Embassy, please contact the Consular Section in advance of your visit and we will provide you with a document checklist. To schedule an appointment, please click here.

Child born abroad to two U.S. citizens: A child born outside of the United States or its outlying possessions to parents, both of whom are citizens of the United States, is entitled to citizenship provided one of the parents had, prior to the birth of the child, been resident in the United States or one of its outlying possessions. (No specific period of time is required.)

Child born abroad to one U.S. citizen parent and one non U.S. citizen on or after November 14, 1986: A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. citizen parent may be entitled to citizenship providing the U.S. citizen parent had been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for five years, at least two years of which were after she/he reached the age of fourteen. This period of physical presence must have taken place prior to the birth of the child.

Child born abroad to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. citizen parent between December 24, 1952 and November 3, 1986: A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. citizen parent, may be entitled to citizenship providing the U.S. citizen parent had, prior to the birth of the child, been physically present in the United States for a period of ten years, at least five years of which, were after she/ he reached the age of fourteen.

Child born out of wedlock to a U.S. citizen mother: A child born outside of the United States and out of wedlock to a U.S. citizen mother is entitled to U.S. citizenship providing the U.S. citizen mother had been physically present in the United States for a continuous period of at least one year at some time prior to the birth of her child.

Child born out of wedlock to a U.S. citizen father: A child born outside of the United States to an U.S. citizen father where there is no marriage to the non-American mother is entitled to U.S. citizenship providing the American citizen father had been physically present in the United States for the period of time as specified in previous paragraphs for children born in wedlock to one U.S. citizen and one non-U.S. citizen parent, either before or after November 14, 1986; and the following is fulfilled:

  • The father must sign a sworn statement agreeing to provide financial support for the child until s/he reaches the age of 18 years; and
  • One of the following conditions is met:
  • The father provides a written statement acknowledging paternity; or
  • The child is legitimated under local law or
  • Paternity is established by a competent court before the child attains the age of 18 years; and
  • The alien mother must complete an "Affidavit to establish paternity of child" before a consular officer.

Physical Presence: This is the actual time when the parent was physically present in the United States, not simply as a resident. This means that any travel outside the United States, including vacation, should be excluded. Please submit old passports if available, as evidence. If unavailable, other evidence may be required. Note: Any periods of time spent overseas with the United States Military/Government etc. may be computed as physical presence in the United States for transmission of citizenship purposes. Time spent as a dependent of a United States Military/Government employee may also be computed as physical presence. Military records may be requested. This is the actual time when the parent was physically present in the United States, not simply as a resident. This means that any travel outside the United States, including vacation, should be excluded. Please submit old passports if available, as evidence. If unavailable, other evidence may be required. Note: Any periods of time spent overseas with the United States Military/Government etc. may be computed as physical presence in the United States for transmission of citizenship purposes. Time spent as a dependent of a United States Military/Government employee may also be computed as physical presence. Military records may be requested.

What if I do not meet the requirements for transmission of citizenship to my child?

Please complete and return the form FS-579 by mail together with a covering letter explaining that you do not meet the requirements for transmission of citizenship to your child. You will be sent a formal letter of "no claim". This letter should then be submitted with any visa application you may make on behalf of your child.

If your child wishes to take up residence in the United States, she/he must obtain an immigrant visa unless she/he can qualify for naturalization as described below.

Can my child qualify for citizenship through his/her grandparents?

Whether or not the child intends to reside in the United States, an alternative procedure now exists for becoming a U.S. citizen If the child is under eighteen years of age and has a U.S. citizen grandparent who meets the physical presence requirements as specified above, the child may qualify for expeditious naturalization under the Immigration and Nationality Technical Corrections Act of 1994. Although not entitled to U.S. citizenship at birth, the child can through this procedure, become a U.S. citizen by naturalization without first having to take up residence in the United States. It is, however, necessary for the child to travel to the United States for the naturalization, and all applications and documentation must be submitted and approved beforehand. For information and application material for expeditious naturalization, please write to Chief, Naturalization Branch, INS Headquarters, 425 I Street NW, Room 3214 HQADN, Washington, D.C. 20536, USA.

Further information: If you have further questions regarding citizenship, you can contact the Consular Section at consularharare@state.gov

Registering the Birth and obtaining a United States Passport
If you believe that your child has a claim to U.S. citizenship, it will be necessary for the U.S. citizen parent to appear in person at this office in order to execute an application for a "Consular Report of Birth Abroad" before a consular officer. At that time a passport application may also be executed.

Your child must be registered before the age of eighteen, or before his/her first trip to the United States, whichever is sooner.

What documents are required?

  • Zimbabwean Birth Certificate: Please bring the child's long-form birth certificate, which is issued by the local authorities. This document shows both parents' names.
  • Marriage Certificate: Full copy issued by the local authorities. If married in the United States, please provide a state certificate issued by the civil authorities.
  • Evidence of Parents' Citizenship and Identity: Parents' current US passports must be submitted at time of application. Note: Military members in active duty status may present any of the following evidence if not in possession of a US passport: a birth certificate issued by the State Vital Statistics Office bearing a raised state seal and showing a file date no later than one year from the date of birth; or a certificate of naturalization; or, if parent was born outside the United States, a Consular Report of Birth (form FS-240 or FS545).
  • Divorce Decrees/Death Certificates: It will be necessary to show termination of all prior marriages. 
  • Application for Consular Report of Birth. Please complete this form legibly and correctly. Instructions on how to complete this form are given on the reverse side.
  • The form attached to FS-579 is an application for a Social Security Number Card for your child if he/she is under the age of 5 at the time of application. Please ensure that it is accurately completed. Note: Do not sign the form until told to do so - it must be executed in the Embassy.

Note: If you wish to have your original documents returned, please present the originals together with photocopies. Upon examination, the originals will be returned to you.

Appointments

  • You can schedule
    Appointments for
    Passport Service and
    Consular Reports
    of Birth Abroad here

Contact Information

  • Address:
    American Citizen Services
    172 H. Chitepo Avenue
    Harare, Zimbabwe

    Telephone:
    (263) 04-250-593
    (263) 04-250-594
    (Dialing from the US; 011-263-4+ phone number)
    For non-emergency info, call between 8 am - 4pm
    or,
    Email:
    HarareConsular@state.gov

    Appointment Hours: Monday - Thursday
    10:00 am - 11:00 am and 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

    Info Hours: Monday - Thursday
    8:00 am - 11:00 am and 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm