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Official Launch of National Infection Prevention and Control Guidelines

Official Launch of National Infection Prevention and Control Guidelines

Official Launch of National Infection Prevention and Control Guidelines

WHO:  Ministry of Health and Child Welfare Permanent Secretary, Brigadier General Dr. G.  Gwinji,

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention Zimbabwe Country Director, Dr. Peter Kilmarx

Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Professor Exnevia Gomo

The Zimbabwe Infection Prevention and Control Project.

WHAT:          The Ministry of Health and Child Welfare (MOHCW) will launch the National Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) Guidelines which will strengthen infection control practices in health care facilities nationwide to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), among patients and staff. The IPC guidelines were developed through a consultative process that was initiated by the East, Central and Southern African College of Nursing (ECSACON), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Zimbabwe.  The IPC guidelines were finalized with financial assistance from the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through CDC/Zimbabwe and Biomedical Research and Training Institute (BRTI) under the Zimbabwe Infection Prevention and Control Project (ZIPCOP). The overall objective of the project is to support the MOHCW in strengthening IPC in health care facilities in Zimbabwe. One of ZIPCOP’s key objectives is to assist the MOHCW to institute policies and guidelines in order to facilitate the implementation of infection and control programs in health facilities. The U. S. government through PEPFAR and CDC/Zimbabwe will support ZIPCOP with US$4 million over five years.  The program started in 2011 and is in the second year of a five-year cooperative agreement.

WHEN:       Friday, 7 June 2013; 09:00 to 12:00 hours

WHERE:       Harare Rainbow towers, 1 Pennefather Avenue, Samora Machel Avenue West, Harare

WHY:           Health facility-acquired infections, including airborne diseases such as tuberculosis and blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis and HIV, are a major concern for the MOHCW.  The MOHCW and its partners recognize the need to prevent and control infection in health settings and are therefore, making a concerted effort to reduce transmission of infections in the health facility environment. National IPC guidelines set standards for IPC practice in health facilities, making their launch a crucial component of the MOHCW’s effort to strengthen IPC practices.

“The MOHCW will launch the National IPC Guidelines in accordance with WHO Regional Office for Africa guidelines. The launch is also in line with the 2000 resolution to strengthen infection prevention and control through the development of IPC guidelines passed by the East, Central and Southern Health Community (ESCA-HC) IPC is therefore, one of the pillars that provide safe and quality care in all health care settings,” said Ministry of Health and Child Welfare Permanent Secretary, Brigadier General Dr. G.  Gwinji.

.“ZIPCOP is an important intervention to better protect Zimbabwean health care workers and patients alike from preventable infections. CDC will continue to support the ZIPCOP program to develop other complementary documents which include the ICP Policy, IPC Strategy, and the IPC monitoring and evaluation plan which are critical in infection prevention and control,” said Dr Peter Kilmarx, CDC/Zimbabwe country director.

‘Good IPC practice is a critical component of quality and safe health care delivery. The National IPC Guidelines were long overdue as they define the national standards for effective IPC, and provide the framework for training, practice and quality assurance. The ZIPCOP consortium will provide its technical capacity in IPC to support the MOHCW in establishing and strengthening the appropriate technical and policy environment, and capacity building for IPC practice in health care facilities in Zimbabwe,’ said Professor Gomo, ZIPCOP Project Director.

Both the U.S. and Zimbabwe governments are encouraged about the launch of the IPC guidelines and will continue to collaborate in the response to HIV/AIDS in the country. PEPFAR has pledged $95 million dollars towards the response to HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe for 2013.

 

             For additional information, please contact:

 

  • Donald Mujiri, Public Relations Manager, MOHCW Tel: +263 71267337, dmujiri@gmail.com
  • Gladys Dube, Infection Prevention & Control Liaison Officer MOHCW/ZIPCOP Tel:+263 (0)772377334, gndube2000@gmail.com
  • Sharon Hudson-Dean, Public Affairs Officer, US Embassy – Public Affairs Section,

Tel: +263 4 758800-1, Fax: 758802, hararepas@state.gov